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Patients want to read, share their medical records

Patients want easy access to any notes their doctor has recorded about them, and they want the right to let others view their medical information, according to a pair of U.S. studies.Read the complete story here. Source: Reuters, reporting by Kerry Grens in New York, editing by Steve Orlofsky.

Eight out of 10 Hospitals Plan to Install EHR Systems

More than eight in 10 hospitals (81%) plan to achieve meaningful use of electronic health-record systems under the federal program that offers incentive payments to boost the use of health information technology under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, according to a news release from HHS.Also, 65% of hospitals will enroll during Stage 1 of the incentive program, which...

Modern Times Create New Healthcare Provider

More follow-up care is being orchestrated by hospitalists, a type of physician-administrator that has grown in number from 800 in the 1990s to 30,000 today. Hospitalists are increasingly taking over the care of hospitalized patients from overburdened family doctors, and are also largely credited with reducing the length of hospital stays by 17-30% and reducing costs by 13-20%, according to studies in The Journal of the American Medical Association....

Missouri Hospital Connects to Patients through Website

The Missouri Hospital Association, based in Jefferson City, has launched a website aimed at providing the state's residents with useful health information while alerting them to hospital-based wellness events in their communities.  The site, Missouri Health Matters, contains instructional articles written by Missouri physicians and health advocates. A wide range of topics, from health...

Pricing transparency gaining renewed interest

Led by a physician lawmaker, members of Congress on both sides of the aisle have shown renewed interest in mandating a boost in healthcare pricing transparency, including charges for physician services. Read more on "Pricing transparency gaining renewed interest"

Electronic medical orders may save lives

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Doctors at a California children's hospital have found the first evidence that using an electronic system to communicate their orders may save lives. Computerized physician order entry (CPOEs) allow doctors to relay prescriptions to pharmacists without delay, and without the need for the pharmacist to decipher doctors' scrawl.

Electronic Drug Information System "AiDKlinik" Reduces The Number Of Adverse Drug Interactions

To get life-threatening diseases under control, patients in the intensive care unit usually are administered many medications at the same time. Even for experts, it is difficult to keep track of the variety of possible side effects and interactions. The team headed by Dr. Thilo Bertsche, director of the cooperation unit for clinical pharmacy at Heidelberg University Hospital, has now shown that physicians can reduce serious events resulting from drug interactions by about half with the...

First, "do no harm"

Consumers hear the words “electronic medical record,” and they fear medical identity theft and privacy violations. But do they hear the word “hospital” and fear a life-threatening medical error? According to William Braithwaite, MD, chief medical officer at Anakam, Inc., paper records can’t keep patients safe, nor do they guarantee privacy. I recently heard Braithwaite, the former senior adviser on health information policy for the Department of Health and Human Services,...

Survey: Hospitals will struggle to meet "meaningful use"

All the pundits, vendors and interest groups have weighed in on the Dec. 30 proposal for "meaningful use" of EMRs, but what do the people who actually have to demonstrate meaningful use to earn Medicare bonus payments think? According to a survey from Computer Sciences Corp., hospitals on average are about halfway toward meeting the proposed criteria, and only one-quarter of those queried have 70 percent of the requirements covered, suggesting that HHS and CMS may have set the bar...

Hospitals call for incentive definitions that promote EHR adoption

Forty-three hospitals and health systems today urged federal officials to define "hospital" and "hospital-based physician," as outlined in the HITECH Act, in a way that makes health information technology available to the greatest number of hospitals and physicians. In a letter to the White House Office of Health Reform, Department of Health & Human Services and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the group recommends defining a hospital "as a discrete site of service, so...

Switching to EMR requires knowledge, flexibilty

Can being an 'early adopter' save your hospital millions of dollars? We both know the answer depends on what you're adopting. Suppose we are discussing the adoption of an idea. Can that be analogous to not adopting another idea? I think it can. Allow me to explain. Many providers are in the process of making a very expensive, highly complex, and wide-ranging decision regarding their healthcare information technology strategy (HIT) for their electronic healthcare records system...

Poorly implemented EMRs

This may not come as shocking news to people in the business, but it's good to get it out there to the general public: Not all EMR implementations are created equal, and some actually can increase the risk of medical errors. "Our basic position is that the current products cannot meet our quality, safety or efficiency needs," University of New Mexico internist Dr. Kendall Rogers, chairman of an IT task force for the Society of Hospital Medicine, told a reporter for the Huffington...

Supplier exec: Connectivity will unleash the power of health IT

Electronic medical records and computerized physician order entry won't help the nation meet the goals of the the federal stimulus legislation of patient-centered coordinated care, improved quality of care, reduced medical errors and less duplication. It will take connectivity between EMRs and other medical technologies, and it will require full, two-way interoperability, says a medication management executive. Writing in Hospitals & Health Networks, Jeff Pelletier,...

Digital Divide Appears Between Hospitals That Treat The Rich And Poor

"Hospitals that disproportionately care for poor patients are less likely than other hospitals to have adopted health information technology," according to an October study published in Health Affairs, American Medical News reports. The economic stimulus legislation in February directed $19 billion in federal investments to help all types of hospitals adopt electronic records, but some researchers are concerned the money may not close that divide. "Yet there is hope that...

Hospital tech teams prepare for stimulus funds

Hospitals across the country are poised to take advantage of the federal dollars from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that will become available – perhaps sooner than an official meaning of "meaningful use." Some hospitals and healthcare systems are looking not only to help themselves, but also their associated physicians and the health information exchanges that can link them all together. "I don't see us going after the grant money directly," said William...

Out of the loop? CFOs, CEOs need to get on the ARRA bandwagon

Healthcare chief financial officers and chief executive officers seem to be out of the loop when it comes to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and it's high time that they get in on the action, according to Susan DeVore, president and CEO of Premier, a healthcare improvement alliance. "If CFOs and CEOs aren't involved, they need to be," she said. Some, however, are already looking at what should come next. "There is very significant funding for those who can...

National Survey Of US Hospitals Shows Information Technology Has Yielded Neither Administrative ....

The increased computerization in U.S. hospitals hasn't made them cheaper or more efficient, Harvard researchers say, although it may have modestly improved the quality of care for heart attacks. The findings, published in the online edition of the American Journal of Medicine, contradict claims by President Obama and many lawmakers that health information technology (health IT), including electronic medical records, will save billions and help make reform affordable....

More hospitals roll out EMRs

CHICAGO – More than four in 10 hospitals stand a good chance of meeting the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act’s meaningful use criteria in 2011, according to the latest data from HIMSS Analytics. HIMSS Analytics President and CEO Dave Garets unveiled Q3 2009 data last month showing that just more than 40 percent of hospitals had reached Stage 3 on the HIMSS Analytics EMR Adoption Model. That’s up 5 percentage points from 2008 data and about 30 percentage points higher than...

Survey: Healthcare isn't ready for HITECH's security breach notification rules

CHICAGO – Business associates who handle private patient information for healthcare organizations are largely unprepared to meet the new data breach related obligations included in the HITECH Act, according to a new survey. Those affected include billing operations, credit bureaus, benefits management, legal services, claims processing, insurance brokers, data processing firms, pharmacy chains, accounting firms, temporary office personnel and offshore transcription...

Louisiana hospital links"smart pumps" to its EHR

BATON ROUGE, LA – Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, a 700-bed hospital in Baton Rouge, La., has integrated its infusion pumps with a bar-code point-of-care system. Helping set the standard for interoperability between medical devices and electronic health records, Our Lady of the Lake achieved the connection with the help of EHR provider Cerner and pump provider Hospira. The connected medication infusion device, also known as a a "smart pump," helps minimize...

Most Wired survey shows hospitals are tightening their IT belts

CHICAGO – The economy is forcing hospitals to consider delaying or scaling back their IT projects, according to a survey of America’s “most wired” hospitals and health systems. The Most Wired Survey, conducted annually by Hospitals & Health Networks magazine, the journal of the American Hospital Association, found that even with incentives being made available to implement IT, hospitals still have a long way to go. Officials at the hospitals surveyed said they...

Videos

Electronic Health Records 2.0: What Does the Future Hold?

This Expert voices panel focuses on Electronic Health Records 2.0, which aired on Federal News Radio (WFED) on February 28, 2012. Panelists include: Peter Basch, MD, FACP, Medical Director, Ambulatory EHR...

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